What does diet mean in government

By | January 6, 2021

what does diet mean in government

Mean Cite. House of Representatives government election. September 27, dissolution. Views Read Edit View history. The emperor was now represented by a prince of the empire as his commissioner; a jurist was appointed as subcommissioner; and the elector of Mainz, archchancellor of the empire, had charge of the business of the what ln the Diet. Does 2, diet. October 24, dissolution. January 13,

Under the Meiji Constitution of , the Imperial Diet was established on the basis of two houses with coequal powers. The upper house, the House of Peers Kizokuin, was almost wholly appointive. Initially, its membership was slightly less than , but it was subsequently increased to approximately The peers were intended to represent the top rank and quality of the nation and to serve as a check upon the lower house. Its powers were in many respects largely negative. Without Diet approval, no bill could become law. The government did have the right to issue imperial ordinances in case of an emergency, but if these were to remain in effect the Diet had to approve them at its next session. There was one significant limitation upon the traditional legislative control over the purse strings. If the Diet did not pass the budget in a manner acceptable to the government, the government had the right to apply the budget for the previous year. This provision was borrowed from Prussian practice. The Diet did not initiate important legislation; this was chiefly the function of the executive.

In the Carolingian empire, meetings of the nobility and higher clergy were held during the royal progresses, or court journeys, as occasion arose, to make decisions affecting the good of the state. After , definitively, the emperor called the Diet to meet in an imperial or episcopal city within the imperial frontiers. The members of the Diet were originally the princes, including bishops of princely status, but counts and barons were included later. After the representatives of imperial and episcopal cities were recognized as members of the Diet, and at this time the electoral princes, whose duty it was to elect the emperor, began to meet separately, a division formally confirmed in the Golden Bull of Charles IV , which established the number of the electoral princes as seven. See elector. Beginning in the 12th century the power of the emperor gradually declined; by the Diet was divided into three colleges that met separately: 1 the electoral college of seven lay and ecclesiastical princes presided over by the imperial chancellor, the archbishop of Mainz; 2 the college of the princes with 33 ecclesiastical princes and 61 lay princes, presided over by the archbishop of Salzburg or the archduke of Austria; 3 the college of the cities presided over by the representative of the city in which the Diet met. The college of cities was separated eventually into the Rhine and Swabian divisions, the former having 14 towns and the latter The emperor could ratify part of the recess or the whole of it, but he could not modify the words of the recess. The emperor was now represented by a prince of the empire as his commissioner; a jurist was appointed as subcommissioner; and the elector of Mainz, archchancellor of the empire, had charge of the business of the meetings of the Diet. Diet Article Additional Info. Print Cite.

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